darkbeat

    This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

    • just watched that movie and it was a completely depressing experience.
      i think of all the music showcased and all the producers interviewed, there wasn't a single bit that i found appealing. instead, a widespread lack of talent and musicianship.

      one thing i found interesting: they didn't care to explain what "electro" is at all. some brief mentioning of the origins, but mostly it seemed if to them electro is just a subgenre of rave/techno.
      and you know what? maybe they are right. maybe modern / new school electro doesn't have that much in common with what i consider electro.
    • well, if you don't like this type of electro (the real NEW electro)
      then don't expect to enjoy a documentary about it. ;)

      inspired by this thread i watched it for the second time yesterday
      and i think its really good! the best docu there is on new electro.

      at least in the first 15 minutes Scape One and Ectomorph talk about the origins
      (of THIS style of electro) but noone said its a "subgenre" of rave/techno.
      so not sure what you mean.


      anyone who hasn't seen it... get the DVD! 8-)
      it has interviews with Aux 88, Bass Junkie, Dark Vektor, Mr Velcro Fastener, Dexorcist, Ectomorph, Cosmic Force, Scape One, Boris Divider, Egyptian Lover, Transparent Sound, Rob Euroh ...and many more!

      darkbeatmovie.com/




      "Electro Dziska" is another nice doku on new electro that Iris made: electro-dziska.com/
    • I think what today is called New Electro or Nu Electro really is the straight descendant of what Kraftwerk startet with Numbers or Music Non Stop. What many people refer to as Oldskool Electro is what was made out of Kraftwerk inspired beats (and sampled ones) which were incorporated into HipHop - this is what became Electro Boogie Breaks.

      So if you are European and are mostly influenced by Kraftwerk, Rother and Techno, then this is what electro is for you. If you have the HipHop background, then this DVD won't satisfy your taste.
    • drschmidt;18642 wrote:

      I think what today is called New Electro or Nu Electro really is the straight descendant of what Kraftwerk startet with Numbers or Music Non Stop. What many people refer to as Oldskool Electro is what was made out of Kraftwerk inspired beats (and sampled ones) which were incorporated into HipHop - this is what became Electro Boogie Breaks.

      So if you are European and are mostly influenced by Kraftwerk, Rother and Techno, then this is what electro is for you. If you have the HipHop background, then this DVD won't satisfy your taste.
      Very true.
      Good things take time, and bad things waste it.
    • ok, so let me get to the basics:

      1. I'm always open to discovering new music, that's why I watched the movie.

      2. It was definitely said that new electro was influenced by electronic music of the past 20 years, and that primarily means: techno/rave. It seemed to me that they wanted to distance themselves from the US strain of electro FUNK and claim a European development aka Kraftwerk - Techno - new electro. And just from listening to the tracks, I clearly felt that soundwise, new electro is closer to techno than to old school electro.

      3. Electro funk isn't necessarily tied to hip hop. Think of freestyle, think of electro soul such as shannon, aleem etc. And even If I think of Juan Atkins (and even early Detroit techno), there is a lot of funk and soul in it which new electro is definitely lacking.

      4. I don't think new electro can be seen as an extrapolation of Kraftwerk. Kraftwerk have always been ultra-melodic, and there is always a dialectic relation in their music between the form (electronic) and the romantic-nostalgic content (music). I don't see melody, I don't see romanticism and nostalgia in new electro.

      You might say that new electro is an extrapolation of numbers, but that wouldn't do Kraftwerk any justice. All their albums are concept albums, and each song must be understood in the context of the whole album. Numbers is building a climax that is resolved in Computerworld2, so if you're just basing everything on numbers, you cannot claim to be representing the ideas of Kraftwerk.
    • I didn't say that Nu Electro does Kraftwerk justice. I just said out of which tracks this style initially drew its main influences. That's how it work: You capture the essence of a track that you like and work from there one. That's what Rother did, and e.g. Boris Divider after him.

      Cheers Andreas
    • lj;18666 wrote:

      ok, so let me get to the basics:

      O.k the basics,,,,, new skool " does not come with built in nostalgia " you have to take it for what it is, it has no built in reminiscing factor, No " i remember dancing dancing to this track on the linoleum" or " i remember this track getting played on the radio back in the day" what makes me say this is a lot of people i know that only like the " N.Y. old skool " witch is only mid skool ELECTRO by the way, at best, is that 95% of the time on them hearing a "new to them" N.Y. OR L.A. mid skool track they have never heard before, say ooooo thats over rated, or thats not as good as people say, thats because they cant reminisce on it.......

      lj;18666 wrote:

      I'm always open to discovering new music, that's why I watched the movie.

      Looks like you are not as open as you think ???

      lj;18666 wrote:

      It was definitely said that new electro was influenced by electronic music of the past 20 years,

      Change that to the last 50 years or more. karl heinz stockhausen delia derbyshire etc ......

      lj;18666 wrote:

      It seemed to me that they wanted to distance themselves from the US strain of electro FUNK

      far from it, it was the americans the " rap hip hop strain " that distanced themselves from us, not only did they distance them selfs from ELECTRO music but they distanced them selfs from the B-BOYS / GRAFFITI AND EVEN THE D.J.s they pushed us away, apart from KRS-1 and a very few others they all to a man turned their backs on electro.

      lj;18666 wrote:

      I don't see romanticism and nostalgia in new electro.

      thank fuck if a scene stays stagnated, its the end of it, we always have to move and keep pushing on, the last thing i would like to hear is my school teacher / uncle / dad saying i liked elctro in the 70s and i like the way it is now. then its dead.

      lj;18666 wrote:

      Kraftwerk All their albums are concept albums, Numbers is building a climax,

      Not at all pink floyd / jarre/ rick whatman / the original "cybotron" did so called concept albums.

      lj;18666 wrote:

      you cannot claim to be representing the ideas of Kraftwerk.

      No one in the world can claim to be representing the ideas of Kraftwerk. no one in their right mind is or are representing kraftwerk they are a law unto them selfs.

      Cheers
      DEE
    • drschmidt;18667 wrote:

      I didn't say that Nu Electro does Kraftwerk justice. I just said out of which tracks this style initially drew its main influences. That's how it work: You capture the essence of a track that you like and work from there one. That's what Rother did, and e.g. Boris Divider after him.

      Cheers Andreas


      ok, i can see where you are coming from.
      but i would still insist: most of nu electro and new skool breaks is a depleted, impoverished version of kraftwerk, taking over some electronic sounds but completely missing their essence aka what makes kraftwerk such a great group.
      rother on the other hand has all those elements in his music: a feeling of nostalgia, romanticism, haunting, scepticism, "weltschmerz". he is a very soulful artist.
      boris divider isn't. at least i couldn't discover any of it in his music until now.

      @ darrell: some misunderstanding: when i talked about romanticism & nostalgia, i didn't mean a retro nostalgia for the old school or stagnation of any sorts. i was referring to the period of romanticism (in arts and music) which is characterized by a general feeling of longing and yes, nostalgia ... and i would argue that you can find those topics in kraftwerk's music as well as in a lot of electro i like. (off the top of my head, think of that famous newcleus intro where they talk about leaving their home in search of a utopian place)

      :)
    • darrell;18670 wrote:

      far from it, it was the americans the " rap hip hop strain " that distanced themselves from us, not only did they distance them selfs from ELECTRO music but they distanced them selfs from the B-BOYS / GRAFFITI AND EVEN THE D.J.s they pushed us away, apart from KRS-1 and a very few others they all to a man turned their backs on electro.



      You really get a kick out of saying some outrageous shit, don't you! ::) How could we have possibly distanced ourselves from Electro music when WE HAD NEVER EVEN HEARD OF ELECTRO MUSIC!

      I can only speak for myself, but I was making Electronic DANCE music! Mine had what I considered a New Wave and Hip-Hop (NEW word at the time) flavor to it. Well, in the United States, Hip-Hop got slower and sample-based and diverged from Dance music which became more 4/4 beat oriented. I kept my feet in BOTH camps, producing sample based Hip-Hop AND Electronic and synth based Dance and House. There were no B-Boys left! And the stupidest thing I ever heard, we distanced ourselves from graffiti writers... WTF?!!! Who makes music for graffiti writers???? I was a graffiti writer in the '70s, burning up the A, C and F lines, and THERE WAS NO MUSIC INVOLVED!!! As for the DJs, we didn't push them away, we FOLLOWED them! I was in IDRC throughout the '80s and into the '90s, I KNOW what the DJs were playing!

      We didn't turn our backs on shit, we had NO IDEA what was going on over there! We live in another fukkin hemisphere!
    • I always find it funny how discussion about individual tastes for music become discussions about music history. The first is rather subjective, the other somewhat objective......

      The essence is, that the US and the European side drew their influences from the same sources and reflected them through their musical backgrounds at that given time. In the US that had to be the emerging hip-hop scene in the late 70s, perhaps disco and house after that, in Europe one has to count on electro-pop, EBM and techno. Today the two different strands are not isolated and have influenced each other quite substantially.

      And of course the results have to be different. But different doesn't imply that one is superior. Discussing musical taste is like dancing to architecture - rather useless. Getting frustrated about a DVD that doesn't live up to one's expectations shouldn't lead to the conclusion that Nu Electro is bad. You just don't lie it.

      A.
    • Cozmo D;18708 wrote:


      WTF?!!! Who makes music for graffiti writers????


      They are lots of graff bases tunes around ??? i always see americans
      getting up set when you say that they distended them self's from
      the other elements, it might have been the record companies saying
      it was old hat and they did not want it in their videos anymore, but now
      if you put on mtv or so all you see is bboys graffiti etc in the videos.

      But this is going off topic and for another part of the board
    • drschmidt;18716 wrote:

      I always find it funny how discussion about individual tastes for music become discussions about music history. The first is rather subjective, the other somewhat objective......

      The essence is, that the US and the European side drew their influences from the same sources and reflected them through their musical backgrounds at that given time. In the US that had to be the emerging hip-hop scene in the late 70s, perhaps disco and house after that, in Europe one has to count on electro-pop, EBM and techno. Today the two different strands are not isolated and have influenced each other quite substantially.

      And of course the results have to be different. But different doesn't imply that one is superior. Discussing musical taste is like dancing to architecture - rather useless. Getting frustrated about a DVD that doesn't live up to one's expectations shouldn't lead to the conclusion that Nu Electro is bad. You just don't lie it.

      A.



      i agree.
      but then again, every piece of music journalism is just subjective taste elevated to somewhat objective/general statements. and even if it always starts with subjective taste, those tastes are determined by objective circumstances. no man is an island.
      :)
    • Everything that the modern mainstream HipHop generation can't understand will be discredited as gay by their homophobic stupid spokesmen. Unfortunately that is quite allot and isn't limited to the US.

      btw. there is also a very unpleasent video by Henry Rollins which I found very disappointing because normally I like his spoken word performances

      youtube.com/watch?v=AyRDDOpKaLM
    • darrell;18722 wrote:

      They are lots of graff bases tunes around ???

      Like? How do you base a track on Graffiti?

      darrell;18722 wrote:

      i always see americans getting up set when you say that they distended them self's from the other elements

      I think your problem is you just don't like Americans. How many do you actually know? What "elements" did we "distance" ourselves from?

      darrell;18722 wrote:

      it might have been the record companies saying it was old hat and they did not want it in their videos anymore, but now if you put on mtv or so all you see is bboys graffiti etc in the videos.
      Times change, people start doing other things, then things come back into vogue in future generations. You do realize this is 25 years later, right?