Why didn't Miami Bass take off in the UK

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    • dme407;37570 wrote:

      ADE bollox???

      Dude still has the most unique vocoder I have ever heard twenty something years later....


      Dude still has the most unique vocoder I have ever heard twenty something years later....

      Probably coz he used the same monotonous setting on every track he did - hardly unique mate ;D (Did he ever change his settings? ;D)
      Nah, when it comes to the vocoder & being unique there will only ever be one winner - KRAFTWERK. They used to get their vocoders, take them apart, doctor them, put them together again & voila. Amazing!!!
      I'm sure Hines would agree that when it comes to being unique with regards the vocoder, nobody could touch Kraftwerk.
      Postcode lottery........you're thick if you deny it exists
    • AITCH-SKI;37617 wrote:

      Probably coz he used the same monotonous setting on every track he did - hardly unique mate ;D (Did he ever change his settings? ;D)
      Nah, when it comes to the vocoder & being unique there will only ever be one winner - KRAFTWERK. They used to get their vocoders, take them apart, doctor them, put them together again & voila. Amazing!!!
      I'm sure Hines would agree that when it comes to being unique with regards the vocoder, nobody could touch Kraftwerk.



      Why change settings when the sound is so original? If it ain't broken don't fix it IMO. And Kraftwerk had unique and divergent vocoders, I agree.
    • Imho in the late 80's when Jungle Bros/EPMD/PE/Rakim/Kane/BDP etc all blew and the bandwagon jumpers who previously used to diss jumped on the Hip Hop train with their PE patches, Kangols, funny pictures in HHC connection where every one of them used to pose in the chin holding position and last but not least the ubiquitous big furry collar black bomber jackets unfortunately Miami Bass was completely alien to them as they we're not familiar with the original Electro-Rap sound from the early to mid 80's anyhow (or if they we're it was only very briefly and by the time of the golden era most had completely forgotten about it!!) Also Miami Bass was a very reginal thing too and I'm guessing that on a worldwide scale it just couldn't cut the mustard so to speak - I remember X Men standing out during this period as one of the only crews still true to this style but even they got no love from the majority of heads listening/buying rap music during this time which was sad -and like a previous poster has said the people into the more electronic style prolly got into jungle techno or bass and bleeps such as LFO/Ragga Twins etc
      to the best of my knowledge I guess that I'm FRESH!
    • dme407-did Ade have anything 2 do with 'JUNGLE KREW'-as 'Elektric Dance' vocoder sounds very similar ?!?
      Kerode-yeah u talk alot of sense.
      I personally never jumped the bandwagon-i started 2 leave it! I got bored as the Rap part got boring. Things like finding a copy of HHC by chance,while on holiday(88),& all everyone went on about was PE & JB's(tho i liked some of both!)! Westwood bored me with his 'gangster'(gunshots,horns,etc,),& as i already heard House 3 years b4,eventually liking Rave(Bass & Bleeps!).Stuff like 'LFO,NIGHTMARES ON WAX,RAGGA TWINS' was great('Ragga Twins dere bout'!). I only remember one instance of Jungle(probably as went off most new music by 93)-a geezer outside this train station with his ghetto blaster distorting 2 #$ck! I liked that track tho!
    • dme407;37682 wrote:

      Why change settings when the sound is so original? If it ain't broken don't fix it IMO. And Kraftwerk had unique and divergent vocoders, I agree.


      Why change settings when the sound is so original?

      Change the settings for reasons of variety mate, thus resulting in a much more interesting sounding vocoder. No delay, no reverb, no time stretch, no key changes, no distortion, no multi tap, zip!. Why? Coz Hines was very limited at what he did & his tracks are testament to this.

      If it ain't broken don't fix it IMO.

      The thing is though it was never fixed to BE broken coz he never knew how to mend it

      And Kraftwerk had unique and divergent vocoders, I agree

      Especially after they got their hands on them indeed ;) Divergence is the answer!!!! Monotony is not.

      Peace fella ;)
      Postcode lottery........you're thick if you deny it exists
    • Eclectro;37629 wrote:

      Aitch-don't 4get the Cybermen(pre 69!).


      LOL, I am aware of the creation of The Cybermen. Those bastards used to shit me up big time as a kid ;D Yeah their voices were created by The Radiophonic Workshop & hats off to 'em for doing a great job.
      Vocoders actually date back to the 30's but were initially a tool for the telecommunications industry.
      Postcode lottery........you're thick if you deny it exists
    • Billy1971-i know what u meant,but i'd also like 2 know about the dubbing of Breakdance 1.

      Aitch-i thought u mite argue that Dr Who never used vocoders/didn't predate Kraftwerk(don't 4get i was a Dr Who nerd,still having clips BBC mite not know about-don't know if that's a good idea admitting 2 that)! Interesting how old Vocoders were(like creating echo/reverb was old)!
      I used 2 love original Transformers cartoons just 4 those voices,especially Skreech!
    • AITCH-SKI;37725 wrote:

      Change the settings for reasons of variety mate, thus resulting in a much more interesting sounding vocoder. No delay, no reverb, no time stretch, no key changes, no distortion, no multi tap, zip!. Why? Coz Hines was very limited at what he did & his tracks are testament to this.


      The thing is though it was never fixed to BE broken coz he never knew how to mend it


      Especially after they got their hands on them indeed ;) Divergence is the answer!!!! Monotony is not.

      Peace fella ;)



      I think Hines is about as original as they come vocoder wise. I think him not using delays, or key changes etc is what kept his method so unique IMO. He was limited but he recorded as a Miami Bass outfit in the late eighites. As u know and I know, Miami Bass isn't that much of an abstract form of music....
    • dme407;37772 wrote:

      I think Hines is about as original as they come vocoder wise. I think him not using delays, or key changes etc is what kept his method so unique IMO. He was limited but he recorded as a Miami Bass outfit in the late eighites. As u know and I know, Miami Bass isn't that much of an abstract form of music....



      I think Hines is about as original as they come vocoder wise

      I think we will always agree to disagree on this one dme ;D I guess the point I was trying to make was it was clear the guy was a huge vocoder fan - he just never tried to utilise the limitless possibilities of sound creation with such an amazing pieces of equipment because I feel he just didn't know how to use it properly. It's like he just "one day" created an extremely mediocre vocodered waveform & stuck with it ::)

      All the best dme ;)
      Postcode lottery........you're thick if you deny it exists
    • Some interesting points thus far, many of which should be seen in conjunction with others made. Largely I believe it to have been due to the quality (or lack thereof), availability (in product terms) and lack of avenues for exposure in the UK (which radio stations would have played Miami Bass?). Culturally I'm not convinced that the Miami Bass aesthetic transfers so readily to a UK context - and I also think that in the mid to late 1980s UK Hip Hop artists slowly began to emerge in to the wider context - with many drawing on a fusion of Hip Hop elements and their own (predominantly black / Afro-Carribbean) heritage (reggae/ragga/dancehall). In this respect Miami Bass wasn't going to compete against the high energy of Soca.

      Furthermore there was the fact that the impact of 'house' music wasn't as deeply felt within the communities I saw, particularly when it morphed in to Acid. Miami Bass would have been seen (rightly or wrongly) as part of that tradition - and there was a very real antipathy between the 'house' sound and the audiences 'discovering' rare groove - often ironically having been pushed to do so through Hip Hop's re-discovery of breaks after Electro Funk. The short lived genre called 'Hip House' has to be seen within this context.

      155 :)
      Never to the left of a yoga mat!