How Clubbing Changed The World

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    • How Clubbing Changed The World

      Looked back through the forum archives, but couldn't find any reference to the Channel 4 programme, 'How Clubbing Changed The World', which was broadcast 3 weeks ago. Apologies if there's already a thread dealing with this.

      Anyhow, some musings about the programme, and the documentation of club culture in general, in this piece I've just uploaded to my blog:

      gregwilson.co.uk/2012/09/how-clubbing-changed-the-world/
    • Great read, detailed, thorough and insightful as always. The lengths media and people go to marginalise/dismiss the importance of hip hop to dance music is mind blowing, it goes on here at EE as well, people hate giving hip hop any credit for anything! I have never understood it and never will accept it!
      ELECTROFUNK is a subsidiary of HIP HOP MUSIC AND CULTURE, don't you forget it suckaz...
    • Well put Gregg, a good read that. As soon as I saw the name Idris Elba I was wondering who the f**k he is and had a feeling it wasn't going to be up to much.

      I have read `last night a DJ saved my life` twice and that for me is the definitive history of dance music, I don't need some half baked documentary for telly telling me otherwise.
    • Anyone listening to that idiot Dave Pearce on Radio 2 right now? The brainwashing continues... he's going back to the 'early days' of the Hacienda and is asking old school house heads to call in with their memories... Graeme Park joining him soon to reinforce the shit and of course, goes without saying, Greg Wilson, hip hop, electro, whatever you want call it is not mentioned or referenced... like it never happened. I'm still buggered if I know why its such a universally avoided subject in reference to music outside of itself... HIP HOP.
      ELECTROFUNK is a subsidiary of HIP HOP MUSIC AND CULTURE, don't you forget it suckaz...
    • I'm surprised by the hostility to the documentary, especially as the people on here have (generally) been around long enough to recognise the fact that this is a documentary produced by Channel 4, with a specific agenda and narrative at work. Remember, however, that the documentary purports to be about the 'culture of clubbing', without ever actually specifying what is meant by those terms.

      Some of you will no doubt respond, 'But it is obvious, surely?'. And therein, by not attempting to provide an alternative answer, you allow the narrative space, with all its potential, to be occupied by productions such as these. Greg Wilson offers an interesting vision, and is undoubtedly correct in identifying the fact that Hip Hop is almost entirely absent from the narrative, thereby (perhaps) explaining why it jumps all around the place with large gaps.

      Being cynical, I wonder that Channel Four was just happy and self-satisfied enough to have the production presented by a black man. It probably allowed them to feel that the underlying lack of objectivity and historical accuracy would be ignored.

      155 :)
      Never to the left of a yoga mat!
    • As a separate point Greg will no doubt be aware that his decision to disengage from music, at a relatively early time, may be used to undermine the argument that he puts forward (rightly or wrongly). Recently this topic of conversation come up in a different context - and the point was made that some of the people being spoken about were not actually involved in the scene at that time. This didn't recognise the fact, of course, that the people concerned were still listening to music and visiting clubs - just not 'playing' there as DJs etc.

      I can't help but wonder if Greg has considered writing a book about his experiences and his thoughts regarding the 'revisionism' that takes place?

      155 :)
      Never to the left of a yoga mat!
    • 155;66340 wrote:

      As a separate point Greg will no doubt be aware that his decision to disengage from music, at a relatively early time, may be used to undermine the argument that he puts forward (rightly or wrongly). Recently this topic of conversation come up in a different context - and the point was made that some of the people being spoken about were not actually involved in the scene at that time. This didn't recognise the fact, of course, that the people concerned were still listening to music and visiting clubs - just not 'playing' there as DJs etc.

      I can't help but wonder if Greg has considered writing a book about his experiences and his thoughts regarding the 'revisionism' that takes place?

      155 :)


      I've pretty much written the first draft of a book dealing with my experience of how the Electro-Funk era unfolded. It's just a matter of finding the time to amend / add further info. One of these days!
    • electrofunkroots;66543 wrote:

      I've pretty much written the first draft of a book dealing with my experience of how the Electro-Funk era unfolded. It's just a matter of finding the time to amend / add further info. One of these days!


      That is great news Greg, please keep us updated as to how you manage to progress that project.

      155 :)
      Never to the left of a yoga mat!
    • electrofunkroots;66543 wrote:

      I've pretty much written the first draft of a book dealing with my experience of how the Electro-Funk era unfolded. It's just a matter of finding the time to amend / add further info. One of these days!


      I'd be happy to help.

      155 :)
      Never to the left of a yoga mat!